Diploma in Modern Culinary Techniques Course-PC1

(For Registration & Fee Details please Contact 0092-321-1222296)

To most people, a cook and a chef are the same thing. The two terms are used interchangeably to indicate someone working away in the kitchen, regardless of whether that individual is cutting vegetables or masterminding the entire menu.For those who work in the culinary field, however, there is a big difference. Although there is no single professional organization that determines exactly who is a chef and who is a cook, most agree that the difference lies in education and experience.If you have a culinary degree and/or trained under a notable chef and have moved up the ranks, you are typically considered a chef. If you simply dabble in the kitchen at home or are just starting out at the bottom of the restaurant totem pole, you are almost always considered a cook.

Eligibilty : Bachelor in any Field and / Or F.Sc./A’Level/Intermediate + Work Experience
Duration : One Year

Course Content :

1.Lab Kitchen
This course introduces the learner to the various subjects that make up the Culinary Arts Certificate program. The
daily activities follow the format of classroom instruction/lecture, individual and group study, followed by an
instructional demonstration where appropriate and then a cooking assignment. Course content is drawn from
blocks A to I of the provincial curriculum and includes program orientation, trade knowledge, kitchen safety, food
safety, production procedures, ordering and inventory; stocks, soups and sauces; vegetable and starch cookery;
meat, poultry and seafood cookery; salads and dressings; kitchen math; receiving and storing; breakfast and egg
cookery. Reference: Block A: Occupational Skills ; Block B: Stocks, Soups and Sauces; Block C: Fruits and
Vegetables; Block D: Starches; Block E: Meats; Block F: Poultry; Block G: Seafood; Block H: Cold Kitchen; Block
I: Dairy and Eggs; Block J: Baking; Block K: Beverages

2.Hot Kitchen
The hot kitchen is a production area where students are involved in the day-to-day running of the kitchen. Course
content is drawn from blocks B, C, D, E, F, G and I (see Lab Kitchen for reference) and includes fast food production,
stocks, soups and sauces, vegetable and starch cookery and breakfast and egg cookery.

3.Cold Kitchen
The cold kitchen is a production area where students are involved in the day-to-day running of the kitchen. Course
content is drawn from blocks A, C, E, F, G and H (see Lab Kitchen for reference) and includes the receiving and
storing of foods, meat cutting and the production of various cold foods from sandwiches to buffet platters. The
satellite food service outlets are also managed and staffed by students for the Level I cold kitchen.

4.Infusions Restaurant
Students’ progress towards the latest culinary techniques and presentations during this course. Students in the
restaurant component run both the food and service sides of a restaurant. Course content is drawn from blocks A
to K inclusive (see Lab Kitchen for reference). Students will be instructed in and given hands-on tasks related to every area of the curriculum both hot and cold.

5.Bakery
The bakery is a production area where students are involved in the day-to-day running of the pastry kitchen.
Course content is drawn from blocks A and J (see Lab Kitchen for reference) and includes principles of baking,
ingredients and nutrition, pastry and desserts, quick breads and yeast breads.